Apple, The BeeEss Company

Done being a “fanboy” yet? No? You must like getting ripped off.
Hiding something you know is defective in a manner that will cause people to think their device should be replaced with a newer one, instead of either having it fixed under warranty or performing a relatively inexpensive repair, is outrageous.
Apple is being sued on this basis alleging consumer fraud, and IMHO rightly so.
Make no mistake — Apple only came clean after being caught. They didn’t tell anyone up front, they didn’t disclose the presence of the software change they made in anything like release notes that accompanied the new code, nothing.
They in fact said nothing despite people noting a problem until they were caught by irrefutable evidence that was presented to the public by a customer, and only thendid they come clean as to what they did.
That is evidence of bad faith and intentional misconduct and I hope the plaintiffs shove it so far up Cook’s and Apple’s ass that they can taste it.
That was not a mistake. It was in fact just the latest manifestation of what Apple as a company is — an extractive firm that has managed to create a religious cult of fervent grape Kool-Aid drinkers among Americans who parade around like they’ve got some part of God in their pockets and thus are blessed.
The truth does not matter to any of those fanbois however, nearly all of whom will keep buying their crap despite now having hard evidence that they’ve been intentionally screwed.

This post was published at Market-Ticker on 2017-12-30.

Goldman Showers Execs With $100 Million In Early Bonuses To Avoid Trump Tax Hit

Goldman Sachs has accelerated nearly $100 million in stock awards to top executives before the end of the year in order to avoid unfavorable changes in the new tax code, according to public filings posted Friday.
The most sweeping overhaul of U. S. tax code in 30 years includes a provision which caps a corporate deduction for executive pay; under current law, corporations can deduct up to $1 million per executive’s base salary, however there’s no cap on deductions for performance-based pay, such as bonuses.
Under the new provisions, both base salary and performance bonuses count towards to $1 million cap – which is why Goldman accelerated $94.8 million in bonuses originally scheduled for January, 2018. By paying the bonuses early, the bank will save money on its own tax bill.

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Sat, 12/30/2017 –.