Apple, The BeeEss Company

Done being a “fanboy” yet? No? You must like getting ripped off.
Hiding something you know is defective in a manner that will cause people to think their device should be replaced with a newer one, instead of either having it fixed under warranty or performing a relatively inexpensive repair, is outrageous.
Apple is being sued on this basis alleging consumer fraud, and IMHO rightly so.
Make no mistake — Apple only came clean after being caught. They didn’t tell anyone up front, they didn’t disclose the presence of the software change they made in anything like release notes that accompanied the new code, nothing.
They in fact said nothing despite people noting a problem until they were caught by irrefutable evidence that was presented to the public by a customer, and only thendid they come clean as to what they did.
That is evidence of bad faith and intentional misconduct and I hope the plaintiffs shove it so far up Cook’s and Apple’s ass that they can taste it.
That was not a mistake. It was in fact just the latest manifestation of what Apple as a company is — an extractive firm that has managed to create a religious cult of fervent grape Kool-Aid drinkers among Americans who parade around like they’ve got some part of God in their pockets and thus are blessed.
The truth does not matter to any of those fanbois however, nearly all of whom will keep buying their crap despite now having hard evidence that they’ve been intentionally screwed.

This post was published at Market-Ticker on 2017-12-30.

The Hidden-in-Plain-Sight Mechanism of the Super-Wealthy: Money-Laundering 2.0

Financial and political power are two sides of one coin.
We all know the rich are getting richer, and the super-rich are getting super-richer. This reality is illustrated in the chart of income gains, the vast majority of which have flowed to the top .01%–not the top 1%, or the top .1% — to the very tippy top of the wealth-power pyramid:
Though all sorts of reasons have been offered to explain this trend–I’ve described the mechanisms of financialization here for years–two that don’t attract much mainstream media attention are money laundering and control fraud, i.e. changing the rules of what’s legal so what was illegal yesterday is legal today–presto-magico, illegally skimmed wealth is now “legal.”
Correspondent JD recently submitted an excellent summary of the progression from Money Laundering 1.0 to Money Laundering 2.0:
Money laundering 1.0 is making dirty money legal, control fraud is manipulating the ‘legal’ options, and money laundering 2.0 is making sure that ‘legal’ fortunes are not taxed and cannot be clawed back.”
Conventional money laundering works by shifting ill-gotten gains into legitimate banks and/or assets. Ill-gotten gains can be laundered quite easily by buying homes or businesses (in the U. S., Europe, etc.) with cash. The home or enterprises can then be sold and the net is now legit.

This post was published at Charles Hugh Smith on DECEMBER 29, 2017.