• Category Archives Health Care
  • This Flu Season Begins the Risk of a Pandemic 2018-2019

    A possible new pandemic is forming from a deadly strain of flu emerging from Australia and will be headed to the UK as the normal flow of travels would take it. Britain will perhaps be hit with the worst flu season in 50 years. Already, there are about 170,000 cases of flu reported in Australia which is more than double this season than usual.
    The strain of flu is called H3N2, and the number of flu deaths in Australia over winter has not yet been released, but it’s thought to be the worst in many years. The last major flu epidemic was in the 1968 pandemic which began in Hong Kong killing more than a million people worldwide. Flu pandemics have been linked to fluctuations in climate, and new research connects the world’s four most recent pandemics to the cyclical cooling of the Pacific Ocean near the equator.

    This post was published at Armstrong Economics on Dec 29, 2017.

  • $1.5 Trillion GOP Tax Bill Signed By Trump – Housing Largely Uneffected Thanks To Lower Marginal Tax Rates (Ham and Mayonnaise!)

    This is a syndicated repost courtesy of Snake Hole Lounge. To view original, click here. Reposted with permission.
    President Trump on Friday signed the Republican $1.5 trillion tax overhaul that is expected to trigger tax cuts for most Americans next year. The GOP/Trump bill undoes some of the damage caused by the tax increases put in place on January 1, 2015 by the Obamacare legislation such as increasing the top bracket from 35% to 39.6%.
    Although this is not related to housing per se, the corporate tax rate has been cut to 21%, putting the US in the middle of the G-7 nations instead of being the most heavily tax major nation on earth.

    This post was published at Wall Street Examiner on December 26, 2017.

  • Man Who Delivered Gift-Wrapped Horseshit To Steven Mnuchin Compares Himself to Jesus

    An LA County psychologist who thinks President Trump’s tax bill stinks to high heaven, compared himself to Jesus after admitting he delivered a gift-wrapped box of horseshit as a Christmas present to Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin. Robby Strong told AL.com he dropped off the box of horse manure at Mnuchin’s house as an ‘act of political theater’ to hammer home the point that ‘Republicans have done nothing for the American worker.’
    Boldly taking the Christ-analogy to a place it has never gone before, Strong told SoCal radio station 89.3 KPCC that “what I did, I would like to compare to what Jesus did when he went into the temple and overturned the tables of the money-changers, who were exploiting the people financially in the name of religion.”
    ‘In the long run, if we don’t do stuff like this, what are we going to have left?’ Robby told KPCC. ‘I feel like that’s what the GOP has done to the American people,’ added the man who, bizarrely, is a psychologist with the LA Department of Mental Health.
    Things start to make much more sense, however, once we learn that Strong claims he was an organizer for the Occupy LA movement; predictably he sides with critics of the $1.5 trillion tax overhaul who say it favors corporations and the wealthy, CBS Los Angeles reported.

    This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 25, 2017.

  • How Opaque Healthcare Pricing Mechanisms Rip Off Consumers

    ‘I’ve been pounding the table about location-based pricing for years. Now we have hard data.’
    Wolf here: Michael Gorback, M. D., who has authored a number of articles for Wolf Street on how opaque pricing in the US healthcare system inflates costs, has been a strong advocate of price transparency. He told me he is ‘one of the very few (only?) pain specialists who accept uninsured patients and publish their cash fee schedule.’
    A ‘cash fee schedule’ is essentially a price list. It’s the norm in just about every industry, except in healthcare, where opaque pricing dominates – to the detriment of consumers.
    By Michael Gorback, M. D., at the Center for Pain Relief in Houston, TX: Imagine you’re out shopping for a new car. You stop by Dealership A and get an offer of $35,000. You decide to do some comparison-shopping and head over to Dealership B. Their price is $39,000. You show them the offer from Dealership A. The trusty salesman says you should buy the car from him at the higher price because his store has a higher overhead. ‘Look at the fancy furniture in our showroom,’ he says. ‘The chairs are really comfortable in the waiting area and we offer espresso and cappuccino. Our rent is also much higher.’
    This is the logic behind higher prices for outpatient procedures done at a hospital as opposed to an ambulatory surgery center or office setting. I discussed this phenomenon on Wolf Street back in 2014.

    This post was published at Wolf Street on Dec 25, 2017.

  • Mapping America’s Worst States For Binge-Drinking This Christmas

    Alcohol abuse can result in health problems including memory loss, poor decision making, fetal damage, liver diseases, hypertension and cardiovascular problems… but ’tis the season…
    As Statista’s Niall McCarthy notes, a recent report by the United Health Foundation found that 18.5 percent of U. S. adults engage in binge or chronic drinking.
    Binging is defined as having four or more (for women) or five or more (for men) drinks on one occasion in the past 30 days. Chronic drinking is having eight or more (for women) or 15 or more (for men) drinks per week. The U. S. has an annual average of 87,798 alcohol attributable deaths while 12,460 road deaths were due to alcohol consumption between 2006 and 2010.

    This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 24, 2017.

  • Three Cheers for the GOP Tax Plan

    Last night the Senate passed the Republican proposed tax plan, a major political victory for Trump and the GOP-controlled Congress.
    At the Mises Wire, we have featured numerous articles pointing out many of the fallacies involved with the general debate on the issue of “tax reform.” For example, the absurdity of “revenue neutral” reform, the danger of raising rates through eliminating loop hopes, the fallacy of trying to address the deficit through eliminating deductions on state and local taxes, and the general notion that tax breaks can be equated to tax subsidies. While the Republican bill does fall for some of these traps, the result of the bill as a whole is a genuine reduction in the tax burden for the majority of Americans. That is always something worth celebrating.
    There are additional benefits to be found within the bill as well.
    For example, the elimination of the Obamacare individual mandate is a small, but significant, step to improving the American healthcare system. As I noted in March, when Paul Ryan’s attempt at Obamacare reform failed, the rise of direct primary care and other market solutions meant that the best thing the GOP could do is simply provide as much freedom as possible for Americans to opt out of government-managed insurance markets:
    Given that this is happening naturally on the market already, the legislative focus for those in Washington concerned about American healthcare should be preventing any future laws and regulations that would destroy this model going forward. Further, rather than trying to completely overhaul Obamacare, simply eliminating the individual mandate tax and allowing Health Savings Accounts to be used for healthcare membership would be subtle ways of empowering the market to revolutionize American medicine. This should be coupled with real tax cuts, not ‘revenue neutral reform’ to help Americans keep their own hard-earned money to help pay for it.

    This post was published at Ludwig von Mises Institute on 12/20/2017.

  • House Passes Trump Tax Plan For Second Time

    Update: In a vote that almost exactly mirrored yesterday’s results, the House once again passed the final Trump tax bill – formerly known as the conference agreement on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act – by a vote of 224-201.
    As the Financial Times pointed out, “the vote gives the president a longed-for legislative victory to carry into his second year, one whose scope matches the radical reforms of healthcare and Wall Street regulation achieved by his predecessor Barack Obama.”
    But the tax bill is already as divisive as Mr Obama’s achievements, ensuring 2018 will be dominated by electoral sparring over whether it will help middle-class families, as Republicans claim, or will deliver further riches to the wealthy and powerful, as Democrats say.
    Mr Trump said at a ‘celebration’ cabinet meeting that people would begin seeing the results of the tax bill in February when adjustments to their after-tax income started appearing in pay checks. ‘We got it done,’ he said, thanking congressional leaders.

    This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 20, 2017.

  • Trump May Delay Signing Tax Bill Until Early Next Year

    As the House prepares to hold its second vote on the final version of the Republican tax plan, Fox Business and Dow Jones Newswires are reporting that President Donald Trump might wait until early next year to sign the bill once it reaches his desk. His reason? By delaying the signing, Trump would effectively push certain spending cuts to programs like Medicare until 2019.
    At issue are so-called “pay as you go,” or “pay-go,” budget rules that could be triggered by deficits in the tax bill. Congressional Republicans are preparing a separate fix to waive the rules after they finish the tax bill. But – given their already jam-packed legislative schedule – if Congress fails to pass the waiver before its year-end recess, one way to delay the cuts would be to wait until January to sign the bill.
    If successful, the waiver would likely be attached to Congress’s ‘continuing resolution’ bill that would keep the government funded through Jan. 19.

    This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 20, 2017.

  • House Passes Tax-Reform Bill – 12 Republicans, All Democrats Vote Against

    Here are the House Republicans who voted against the tax bill, which of course raises the question: With his NO vote, what secret message was Rohrabacher sending to Putin & Assange? pic.twitter.com/B66BY0uIZC
    — Ira Goldman (@KDbyProxy) December 19, 2017

    After more than six weeks of frenzied negotiations, the House of Representatives has passed the reconciled version of President Donald Trump’s tax plan, leaving only one major hurdle between Republicans and their biggest legislative accomplishment of the Trump era.
    In a 227-203 vote, the House passed the tax plan over united Democratic opposition, as well as a flurry of ‘no’ votes from blue-state Republicans who spoke out against provisions in the bill that eliminate deductions for state and local taxesthat will disproportionately impact taxpayers in high-tax states like California and New York. Ultimately, 12 Republicans joined 191 Democrats in voting against the bill.
    The vote followed an empassioned debate with Democrats – who labeled the bill the White House “tax scam” – slamming the bill as an attempt to establish a “permanent plutocracy.” Republicans countered that it would benefit all Americans, and evidence of its sanguine impact on the economy would emerge over the next year.
    The contentious debate that preceded the vote was interrupted several times by protesters, including people who shouted “kill the bill, don’t kill us!” The Hill pointed out that one of the protesters was a woman in a wheelchair who said she relies on Medicaid and warned that the bill would “starve” the public.

    This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 19, 2017.

  • Republican Tax Plan Is Headed For Final Round Of Votes

    Barring some unforeseen catastrophe (or another floor-vote surprise akin to Sen. John McCain’s last minute decision to strike down the Senate’s plan to repeal and replace Obamacare), Congressional Republicans appear all but certain to pass the reconciled version of President Donald Trump’s tax-cut plan – the first time Congress has successfully passed comprehensive tax reform since 1986.
    With their self-imposed Friday deadline looming, the Republicans’ Senate leadership managed to secure commitments from several holdouts, including Maine Sen. Susan Collins, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Utah Sen. Mike Lee.
    At last count, the only Senator who hasn’t committed to a ‘yes’ vote is Arizona’s Jeff Flake. Flake famously delivered a scathing speech condemning President Trump from the floor of the Senate after announcing that he would not seek another term. He has been an outspoken Republican critic of the Trump agenda, per Reuters.
    Meanwhile, Sen. Bob Corker – the only senator who voted against the Senate’s original tax bill – said late last week that he would vote for the current bill after several provisions were added that would benefit him personally, along with a handful of other Republicans.

    This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 19, 2017.

  • Nobel Laureate ‘Discovers’ Cause Of Opioid Crisis: Complete Economic Destruction Of The “White Working Class”

    For several decades now the American Midwest has suffered from unprecedented economic decay courtesy of a persistent outsourcing of manufacturing jobs in the automotive and steel industries, among others. As we’ve noted frequently, that economic decay has resulted in a devastating surge in opioid overdoses that claim the lives of 100s of people each year.
    Of course, many attribute Trump’s staggering victories in states like Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio and Pennsylvania to his efforts to tap into the frustration of the dispossessed Midwest masses by promising a rebirth of the manufacturing economy that once provided them a solid middle-class lifestyle.
    That said, no economic crisis is truly “discovered” until an Ivy League, Nobel-prize-winning economist says it is. As such, we present to you the intriguing findings of Nobel Laureate Angus Deaton who said he was “looking for something else” when he noticed a staggering increase in white mortality rates for people aged 50-54. Per Market Watch:
    That was the case with landmark research undertaken by Nobel Prize winning economist Angus Deaton. The Princeton economist, working with his wife Anne Case, stumbled on the fact that mortality rates were rising for working-age white Americans since 1999.

    This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 14, 2017.

  • Was John Brown Sane?

    The exploits of John Brown have long fascinated historians. His actions, for better or worse, certainly had a significant effect on the country prior to Southern secession, but the fascination with Brown is largely driven by the enigma the man himself has proven to be. In trying to explain his actions and motives, historians have wrestled with questionable and biased testimonies by the people who knew him, and many of the mysteries surrounding John Brown have been explained – then and now – by mental disorders.
    But was John Brown crazy? Diagnosing historical figures is an ambitious task, but the history of where the insanity claim for John Brown came from is insightful.
    Psychiatry was evolving in the medical field in the beginning of the nineteenth century. For centuries, physicians in the western world acknowledged four basic psychological illnesses. The first was mania, which was exhibited through erratic behavior, irritability, and wild, racing thoughts. Second was melancholia, which was essentially depression. The third was dementia, defined much as it is today. And finally, there was delirium, which was characterized by hallucinations, delusions, and disorientation.

    This post was published at Ludwig von Mises Institute on December 14, 2017.

  • US Stocks, Bonds, and Real Estate Most Expensive in History

    After seeing the tax reform inspired to jump in small business optimism from the NFIB, today the Duke CFO survey optimism index rose the to the best level since June 2004. Also, it was driven by tax reform. This is though coming with building inflation pressures as the survey ‘also finds the difficulty that companies are having hiring and retaining qualified employees is at a 20 yr high, and that in part will lead to higher wages.’ The survey said CFO’s expect ‘median wage growth of about 3% over the next 12 months.’ Hopefully, higher productivity can offset this as opposed to companies passing that on in higher prices. There is also healthcare inflation that is a worry as expectations are for an 8% rise next year. ‘Nearly half of US companies indicate that the cost of employee health benefits crowds out their ability to spend on long-term corporate investment.’ Like I said before, embrace lower corporate taxes but don’t assume all else equal.
    There was a slight ebbing of bullish enthusiasm according to Investors Intelligence. Bulls fell to 61.9 from 64.2 while Bears ticked up a hair to 15.2 from 15.1. The spread between the two of 46.7 is a 3 week low but is just 3.3 pts from a 30 yr high. Since bulls got back to 60 on October 11th, the Value Line Equal Weighted Geometric index is up 2.2%. A lot of tax reform generated optimism, along with better global growth will meet faster monetary tightening next year. The former certainly won that battle in 2017 also helped by $2 Trillion of ECB and BoJ largesse. That largesse changes dramatically in 2018 but markets are clearly betting on the soft landing scenario, aka a free lunch.

    This post was published at FinancialSense on 12/13/2017.

  • Baltimore Students Create An App To Detect If Their Heroin Is Laced With Fentanyl

    If you have a smartphone, you’ve probably heard the distinct sound of an AMBER alert and or perhaps weather notifications. These notifications are free and great, alerting us to potential danger, and what we need to do to prepare.
    With the help of student programmers, Baltimore health officials have launched a similar notification service, but it’s to warnresidents in the city when a deadly batch of drugs enters their neighborhood. Mike LeGrand, co-founder of the nonprofit Code in the Schools, worked with a team of student programmers around Baltimore to develop ‘Bat Batch Alert’, an anonymous free text messaging service aimed at helping those struggling with heroin addiction to stay alive.
    LeGrand got the idea of ‘Bad Batch Alert’, after he lost a close friend in Florida to an opioid overdose. With a grant from Baltimore City’s health department and data feeds from Emergency medical services (EMS), LeGrand was able to track the ‘hot spots of fentanyl overdoses’ across the city.

    This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 8, 2017.

  • US Officials Confirm Mysterious Cuba Attack Victims Suffered Brain Abnormalities

    In the most specific finding to date about physical damage, AP reports that doctors treating the U. S. Embassy victims of mysterious, invisible attacks in Cuba have discovered brain abnormalities as they search for clues to explain the hearing, vision, balance and memory damage.
    Medical testing has revealed the embassy workers developed changes to the white matter tracts that let different parts of the brain communicate, several U. S. officials said, describing a growing consensus held by university and government physicians researching the attacks. White matter acts like information highways between brain cells.
    As AP details, loud, mysterious sounds followed by hearing loss and ear-ringing had led investigators to suspect ‘sonic attacks.’

    This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 6, 2017.

  • The Cost Basis of our Economy is Spiraling Out of Control

    What will it take to radically reduce the cost basis of our economy?
    Clearly, both rising costs and stagnating income cause households to lose ground, i.e. their income buys fewer goods and services every year. If we had to choose one “big picture” reason why the vast majority of households are losing ground, it would either be the stagnation of income or the spiraling out of control cost basis of our economy, that is, the essential foundational expenses of households, government and enterprise. I’ve often covered the dynamics of stagnating income for the bottom 95%, and real-world inflation, i.e. a decline in purchasing power. But neither of these dynamics fully describes the relentless upward spiral of the cost basis of our economy, that is, the cost of essentials and the foundations of the economy: education, healthcare, energy and labor.

    This post was published at Charles Hugh Smith on MONDAY, DECEMBER 04, 2017.

  • San Diego Continues Desperate Attempt To Control Hepatitis A Outbreak

    San Diego is desperately trying to control a Hepatitis A outbreak brought on by the homeless problem plaguing the state of California. The city has now opened the first of three giant tents meant to contain the outbreak of the deadly virus.
    The first of three industrial-sized tents to house the homeless as part of the city’s efforts to contain a hepatitis A outbreak. The outbreak itself stems from the deplorable conditions people were living in on the streets – mainly, the fecal matter that is left from those who live on the street. Of course, the government isn’t going to climb off the backs of their residents in California, instead, they will continue to raise taxes and create more homeless people while desperately and frantically trying to stop the problems that their overbearing government has caused.
    About 20 people made their way to a bunk bed Friday in the tent that will house 350 single men and women. Two other giant tents will open later this month – one specifically for families and one for veterans. The tents will house a total of 700 people with an attempt to keep them from defecating on the street and spreading the Hepatitis A virus.
    More than 3000 people are homeless in San Diego, and risk contracting the disease which has killed 20 people so far. The city had to divert $6.5 million budgeted for permanent housing to fund the operation of the tents for seven months. The tents will provide an array of services from mental health care to housing navigators. But the city still faces an acute housing shortage for the poor. Faulconer has earmarked more than $80 million in stolen (taxpayer) funds to address the problem. So the city wants to fix poverty by taking more from earners and creating more poverty. Bravo, California.

    This post was published at shtfplan on December 4th, 2017.

  • GOP Releases All 479 Pages Of The Tax Reform Bill – “Vote-A-Rama” Begins

    The Senate tax bill is headed for a potentially unlimited series of decisions on possible amendments – known as ‘vote-a-rama’ – as the full text of the revised bill has just been released.
    As Bloomberg reports, it’s unclear how long that process might take, though we do note that unlike Obamacare, Senators will at least get to see what’s in the bill before they vote on it.
    Democrats could spend hours offering numerous amendments meant to highlight any flaws they believe the bill contains.

    This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 1, 2017.

  • How Trump Mercilessly Trolls The Media In Five Simple Steps

    Almost every morning Americans wake up to yet another Trump tweet storm that sends MSNBC’s ‘Morning Joe’ hosts and guests into an absolute frenzy that begins with modest expressions of ‘outrage’ and ends with Joe Scarborough once again offering up his ‘professional’ medical opinion on Trump’s mental health just before calling for his immediate impeachment.
    Of course, as Axios points out today, that daily ‘Morning Joe’ meltdown is all part of Trump’s simple 5-step plan to manipulate the media into covering precisely what he wants them to cover. Here’s how it works…
    Step 1: Throw an early morning Twitter bomb, usually but not always timed to “Fox & Friends” fodder or reinforcement. The Tweet-bomb frequently hits “fake news” or some social topic with racial undertones. Within minutes, thousands of Trump’s Twitter followers retweet it, and the sparks fly in response. Trump knows this and has bragged to staff about the storm he’s stirring as he hits “publish.” The data: As president, Trump has tweeted about fake news 124 times, mostly before 9 a.m., and his tweets about fake news average more retweets and likes.

    This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 1, 2017.

  • Mapping The United States Of Welfare

    Via HowMuch.net,
    When was the last time you stopped to think about how much the government spends on welfare?
    Most people probably don’t think about it too much, but we bet even for those who do, they don’t know how much their government spends, much less what the money actually pays for.
    That’s why we created a new map showing you how much each state spends on the public dole.
    Our viz takes U. S. Census Bureau data from GoBankingRates to create a map for the entire country. Each bubble represents a state, and the size of the bubble corresponds to the size of the public expenditure on public welfare. We then color-coded each circle according to the size of the expense. Shades of blue mean that the state spends relatively little money, but pink and red indicate a higher-than-average amount. There’s a lot that you can quickly learn by breaking mapping public welfare expenses in this war.
    First off, what is public welfare? This can be a controversial topic with a lot of stereotypes, so let’s get our definitions straight. If you rely on public welfare, then you turn to the government for help with paying your basic necessities, like food, housing and healthcare. The federal government runs programs that provide these types of things, and to varying degrees, so do some states. As you can clearly see, some places are more generous than others.

    This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 1, 2017.