Goldman “Unexpectedly” Exempt From Venezuela Bond Trading Ban

When the White House announced on Friday that Trump had signed an executive order deepening the sanctions on Venezuela, and confirming the previously rumored trading ban in Venezuelan debt that earlier in the week had sent VENZ/PDVSA bonds tumbling, we made what we thought at the time was a sarcastic comment that in light of the recent scandal involving Goldman’s purchase of Venezuela Hunger Bonds, that Lloyd Blankfein’s hedge fund, which now controls the presidency and next year will also take over the Fed courtesy of Gary Cohn, would be exempt from the trading ban:
So all bonds owned by Goldman are exempt from the Venezuela sanctions until Goldman can sell them?
— zerohedge (@zerohedge) August 25, 2017

And, as it so often happens in a world controlled by Goldman (as a reminder, in 2018 the world’s three most important central banks, the Fed, the ECB and the BOE will be run by former Goldman employees: Gary Cohn, Mario Draghi and Mark Carney), sarcasm has a way of chronically turning into truth, and as Bloomberg confirmed overnight, one of Venezuela’s largest bondholders is “breathing a sigh of relief.”
That would be Goldman Sachs Asset Management, which infamously bought $2.8 billion of notes issued by state oil company PDVSA in May, and has since faced sharp criticism for a deal that appeared to supply fresh funds to President Nicolas Maduro. Confirming our initial “sarcastic” reaction, while observers thought the Goldman bonds would be a prime target for new penalties, they were exempt from the order. In fact, the only bonds covered by the trading ban are notes due in 2036 that appear to never have been sold outside Caracas.

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Aug 26, 2017.