US Futures, Global Shares, Dollar All Jump On Brexit, Basel News, Averted US Shutdown; Payrolls Loom

U. S. equity index futures have bounced on the last day of the week, along with European and Asian shares, oil and the dollar following overnight news that the UK and EU have reached a successful conclusion on Phase 1 of Brexit negotiations, that Congress averted a government shutdown with another can-kicking 2 week measure until December 22, after strong Chinese trade data and an upward revision to Japanese GDP, and ahead of the November nonfarm payrolls data which is expected to cement the December Fed rate hike.
Setting the bullish mood this morning was Christmas coming early for Theresa May, who managed to forge an agreement – if only for the time being – with the EU in the early hours of Friday morning to pave way for phase 2, with talks set to move to trade with support being voiced by Senior Brexiteers, Gove and Johnson. In reaction to this, GBP initially hit a 6-month high, however once the agreement had been confirmed, the pound saw a “buy the rumour sell the news” price action, while gilts were met with selling pressreure with the price making a firm move below 124.00.
Also after the close on Thursday, the House voted 235-193 and Senate voted 81-14 to pass the stopgap spending measure which will avoid a government shutdown and fund government through to Dec. 22nd, kicking the can on and averting a government shutdown for another two weeks.
European stocks advance in a broad rally amid optimism over a newly-struck deal between Britain and the European Union to unlock divorce negotiations and proceed to discussing a future trade deal. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index rises 0.7%, with the index heading for a weekly gain of 1.3%. Banks advance the most, up for a second day, as the sector emerged relatively unscathed from global regulators’ final batch of Basel III post-crisis capital rules, with few lenders needing to raise major new funds. Miners are also among the best indusreptry group performers, following copper prices higher. The FTSE 100 is trailing other European indexes, trading little changed, as the pound climb.

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 8, 2017.

A young foreigner’s first impressions of America

Last weekend while I was in Denver, I had the opportunity to speak with a young man from the Netherlands who was attending our charity event.
It was his first trip to the United States, and I’m always interested to hear people’s first impressions.
He told me he was really overwhelmed with the size and scale of everything. China is about the only other country in the world that does everything as big as the US.
He also told me he couldn’t get over how much stuff there is to buy in the US… and how easy it is.
He’s absolutely right. The US is an amazing place for a number of reasons; it’s modern, generally safe, and boasts a high standard of living.
And, yes, as a consumer, it’s one of the best places in the world.
(Though I would suggest that there are parts of Asia that are even better; Hong Kong, for example, has a similar selection of goods and services from all over the world, yet ZERO tax.)

This post was published at Sovereign Man on December 6, 2017.

Asian Market Rout Goes Global On Tech, Tax And Government Shutdown Tremors

A selloff which started in Asia, driven by renewed liquidation of Chinese and Hong Kong tech stocks and accelerated by weaker metal prices which pushed the Shanghai Composite below a key support and to 4 month lows…

… which sent the Nikkei to its worst day since March and the second worst day of the year, while the overall Asia Pac equity index slumped for the 8th day – the longest streak for two years, spread to Europe adn the rest of the world, pushing the MSCI world index lower by 0.3% as investors continued to lock in year-end gains among the best performing assets amid a broad risk-off mood. In FX, the dollar stabilized as emerging-market currency weakness meets yen gains while Treasuries and euro-area bonds gain as focus now turns to efforts to avert a U. S. government shutdown on Saturday. Euro and sterling trade heavy in average volumes while the loonie consolidates before BOC decision.

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 6, 2017.

World’s Third Largest Shipbuilder Crashes 29% Amid Asian Equity Carnage

Shares in Samsung Heavy, the world’s third largest shipbuilder, plunged by 29% during Wednesday’s trading session after unexpectedly forecasting operating losses this year and 2018 and announcing a capital raise. Meanwhile, Asian equities tumbled, led by technology, mining and industrial companies, with the MSCI Asia Pacific Index falling for eight straight days, its longest run of down days since 2015.

‘Things are really getting bad for Samsung Heavy because they have been slow to respond to the weakening market conditions,’ said Park Moo Hyun, an analyst at Hana Financial Investment Co. in Seoul. ‘It’s not going to look good for the company next year.’

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 6, 2017.

Asian Metals Market Update: December-5-2017

The market sharking event could be when President Donald Trump’s eldest son and a former business associate of the president testifies to the U. S. House of Representatives Intelligence Committee. A lot of events are there for the rest of the week. One needs to trade very carefully.
There are concerns that the Chinese infrastructure sector will see a big slowdown next year. This news will prevent industrial metals from a big rise.

This post was published at GoldSeek on 5 December 2017.

Tax Euphoria Fades As Tech Rout Spreads

One look at S&P futures this morning reveals an unchanged market, however it is again the violent sector rotation that is taking place behind the scenes that is the real story, with defensive sectors real estate, retail, food, utilities outperforming while investors continue to bail and book profits on tech stocks after sharp gains since the start of the year. Monday’s Nasdaq rout also spread to European and Asian markets which fall on last minute changes to the tax plan, most notably the retaining of AMT which could prevent companies from making use of intellectual property tax breaks, effectively raising their tax rates. As a reminder, on Monday the Nasdaq fell 1.2% following broad based hedge fund liquidation from the most crowded sector, after tax experts said Senate Republicans unwittingly passed a bill that would mean higher-than-intended taxes for technology firms and other corporations; in sympathy Europe’s Stoxx tech sector index SX8P hit the lowest since late September, down 8% since mid-November
European stocks dipped, trimming the previous session’s sharp gains amid a renewed selloff in tech stocks globally and as weaker industrial metal prices weighed on mining shares which slumped ‘due to a marked slowdown in China’s metal consumption growth, with market participants foreseeing weaker public infrastructure spending growth extending into 2018,’ SP Angel analysts including John Meyer, Simon Beardsmore and Sergey Raevskiy write in note.
The Stoxx 600 is down 0.2%, remaining in a range between its 50-DMA and 200-DMA started in mid-November. The Stoxx tech sector SX8P index falls 0.6%, mirroring a drop in the Nasdaq Monday. As noted above, Europe’s tec sector is down about 8% since a peak in early November, amid a sharp sector rotation out of momentum stocks and into potential winners of the U. S. tax reform. UK’s FTSE 100 outperforms peers amid the weaker pound which had briefly tripped through 1.34 as Brexit talks had been unravelled over disagreements from the DUP in regards to a hard border between Ireland and Northern Ireland. UK grocery retailers are among the top movers in the FTSE 100 after a positive note from Goldman Sachs. Elsewhere, to the downside, health care and material names lag.

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 5, 2017.

Key Events In The Coming Week: Jobs, Brexit, PMI, IP And More

The first full week of December is shaping up as rather busy, with such Tier 1 data in the US as the payrolls report, durable goods orders and trade balance. We also get UK PMI data and GDP, retail sales across the Euro Area, as well as central bank meetings including Australia RBA and BoC monetary policy meeting.
Key events per RanSquawk
Monday: UK PM May To Meet EU’s Juncker & Barnier Tuesday: UK Services PMI (Nov), RBA MonPol Decision Wednesday: BoC MonPol Decision, Australian GDP (Q3) Friday: US Payrolls Report (Nov), Japan GDP (Q3, 2nd) The week’s main event takes place on Friday with the release of November’s US labour market report. Consensus looks for the headline nonfarm payrolls to show an addition of 188K jobs, slowing from October’s 261K. Average hourly earnings growth is expected to slow to 0.3% M/M from 0.5%, while the unemployment rate and average hours worked are expected to hold steady at 4.1% and 34.4 respectively. Hurricane induced volatility should be absent from the November release, and consensus points to a headline print much more in-keeping with trend rate.
Other key data releases next week include the remaining October services and composite PMIs on Tuesday in Asia, Europe and the US, ISM non-manufacturing in the US on Tuesday, ADP employment report on Wednesday and China trade data on Friday.
Focus will also fall on Wednesday’s Bank of Canada (BoC) interest rate decision, with the majority looking for the Bank to leave its key interest rate unchanged at 1.00%, although 3 of the 31 surveyed by Reuters are looking for a 25bps hike. Following the BoC’s back-to-back rate hikes in Q3, interest rate markets were pricing in a 40-50% chance of a hike at the upcoming decision, that has now pared back to 25% as the BoC has sounded more cautious in recent addresses, highlighting that it expected the economy to slow (GDP growth moderated to 1.7% in Q3 on a Q/Q annualised basis, from 4.3% in Q2) while stressing that it remains data dependant. RBC highlights that ‘the BoC has been focused on the consumer’s reaction to the earlier hikes and is content to wait-and-see for the moment. Wage growth – another key metric for the central bank – has improved in recent employment reports (reaching the highest level of growth since April 2016 in November’s report). Despite its softer tone, the BoC continues to stress that ‘less monetary stimulus will likely be required over time’ and as a result the statement will be scoured for any changes in tone. At the time of writing, markets are pricing a 57.2% chance of a 25bps hike in January, with such a move 91.0% priced by the end of March.

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Dec 4, 2017.

Rig For Stormy Weather

What storm? The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DOW) reached another all-time high. Interest rates in the U. S. are yielding multi-decade lows, some say multi-century lows. Trillions of dollars in global sovereign debt have negative yield and European junk bonds yield less than 10 year U. S. treasuries. ‘Official’ unemployment is low. Borrowing is inexpensive. Things are good, so they say!
I Doubt It!
Do you believe the above is a fair and accurate representation of our economic world? If so, how do you explain the following?
Global debt exceeds $200 trillion and is rising rapidly. This massive debt will NOT be paid back in currencies with 2017 purchasing power. Debt MUST be rolled over in continually DEVALUING dollars, euros, yen and pounds. The financial system rolls over maturing debt, adds more, and pretends repayment will not be problematic. Those who hope this will remain true ignore the lessons of history, including sky-high interest rates in the late 1970s, the Asian and Long Term Capital crises in the late 1990s, many defaults and hyperinflations in the last century and the credit-crunch-recession-market-crash of 2008.

This post was published at Deviant Investor on Dec 4, 2017.

Market Talk- December 1, 2017

Although Asian indices opened well on the back of a strong US session, they unfortunately could not hold the levels. Part of the reasoning was the tax Bill would be delayed and having seen the DOW blast through the psychological 24k level many were concerned this delay could threaten Thursday gains. The Nikkei was up over 1% at the open but the uncertainty depleted over half of that gain. The Yen continues to drift with the high 112’s a comfortable trading range as the US markets reopen. Exporters were again leading the way but the weaker currency was a definite factor! Both the Hang Seng and Shanghai indices opened better but the lack of confidence and weak economic data (Manufacturing PMI) added to the uncertainty.

This post was published at Armstrong Economics on Dec 1, 2017.

US Futures, World Stocks, Bitcoin All Hit Record Highs

US equity futures continued their push higher into record territory overnight (ES +0.1%), and the VIX is 1.5% lower and back under 10, after yesterday’s blistering surge in US stocks which jumped 1%, the most since Sept. 11, following Powell’s deregulation promise, ahead of today’s 2nd estimate of U. S. Q3 GDP which is expected to be revised up. U. S. Senate Budget Committee sent the tax bull to the full chamber to vote, and on Wednesday Senators are expected to vote to begin debating the bill. It wasn’t just the S&P: MSCI’s all-country world index was at yet another record peak after all four major Wall Street indexes notched up new highs on Tuesday. Finally, completing the trifecta of records, and the biggest mover of the overnight session by far, was bitcoin which topped $10,000 in a buying frenzy which saw it go from $9,000 to $10,000 in one day, and which is on its way to rising above $11,000 just hours later.
In macro, the dollar steadies as interbank traders and hedge funds fade its rally this week; today’s major event will be testimony by outgoing Fed chair Janet Yellen after Powell said there is no sign of an overheating economy; the euro has rallied on strong German regional inflation while pound surges on Brexit bill deal news; yields on 10-year gilts climb amid broad bond weakness; stocks rise while commodities trade mixed.
In Asia, equity markets were mixed for a bulk of the session as the early euphoria from the rally in US somewhat petered out as China woes persisted (recovered in the latter stages of trade). ASX 200 (+0.5%) and Nikkei 225 (+0.5%) traded higher. Korea’s KOSPI was cautious following the missile launch from North Korea, while Shanghai Comp. (+0.1%) and Hang Seng (+-0.2%) initially remained dampened on continued deleveraging and regulatory concerns before paring losses into the latter stages of trade. Notably, China’s PPT emerged again with Chinese stock markets rallied in late trade, with the CSI 300 Index of mainly large-cap stocks paring a drop of as much as 1.3% to close 0.1% lower. The Shanghai Composite Index rose 0.1%, swinging up from a 0.8% loss, with property and materials companies among the biggest gainers on the mainland. The Shanghai Stock Exchange Property Index surged 3.8%, the most since August 2016. The Shenzhen Composite Index was little changed, after a 1.2% decline, while the ChiNext gauge retreated 0.4%, paring a 1.5% loss. In Hong Kong, the Hang Seng Index was little changed as of 3 p.m. local time, while the Hang Seng China Enterprises Index fell 0.3%Stocks in Europe gained, following equities from the U. S. to Asia higher as optimism over U. S. tax reform and euro-area economic growth overshadowed concerns about North Korea’s latest missile launch. The Stoxx 600 gained 0.8%, reaching a one-week high and testing its 50-DMA. Germany’s DAX, France’s CAC, Milan and Madrid were all up between 0.5 and 0.7% and MSCI’s all-country world index was at yet another record peak after all four major Wall Street indexes notched up new highs on Tuesday. ‘It seems to me markets are still trading on the theory that the glass is half full,’ said fund manager Hermes’ chief economist Neil Williams.

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Nov 29, 2017.

China Regulators Seek To Calm Mania For HK Stocks As Plunge Protectors Make An Appearance

The Chinese authorities’ efforts to contain leverage and reduce risk across the nation’s financial system took another step forward overnight with the ban on approvals for mutual funds that plan to allocate more than 80% of their portfolios to Hong Kong stocks. This looks like a response to surging capital flows into the territory from the mainland and the equity market euphoria in Asia, which saw the Hang Seng index cross the 30,000 mark last Wednesday for the first time in 10 years. As we noted in ‘Very Close To Irrational Exuberance: Asian Equities Break Above All-Time High As Hang Seng Clears 30,000’.
Ongoing southbound flows from the mainland exchanges in Shanghai and Shenzhen – via the connect trading scheme – helped to propel the rally.
The South China Morning Post has more:
China’s securities regulator will suspend the approval of new mutual funds that are meant for investing in Hong Kong’s equity market, putting a temporary cap on southbound capital that has boosted the city’s benchmark stock index to a decade high.
Chinese mutual funds which plan to allocate more than 80 per cent of their portfolio to Hong Kong-listed equities will no longer be approved for sale on the mainland, according to two state-owned funds familiar with the matter, citing an order by the China Securities Regulatory Commission. Only funds that allocate less than half of their portfolio to Hong Kong will be approved, the funds said, echoing a Monday report on the China Fund website, an industry news site.
The Chinese regulator ‘s latest instruction reflects the concern that Hong Kong’s key stock benchmark has risen too much too quickly to a level that was last attained in 2007, before the global financial crisis a year later caused the Hang Seng Index to plunge 33 per cent, and wiped out billions of dollars of value.

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Nov 28, 2017.

Japan, Inc. Rocked Again: Toray Admits To Falsifying Data After Internet Post Exposes Fraud

Corporate Japan’s credibility, already teetering after a barrage of corporate fraud and falsification scandals in recent months, hit another low after Toray Industries, one of Japan’s biggest materials manufacturers, joined a list of companies admitting to falsifying data. On Tuesdaty, Toray announced it had uncovered 149 cases of data fabrication at its subsidiary, Toray Hybrid Cord, in three products sold to tire companies and autoparts makers: tire cords, cords for car hose belts and cords for paper making. According to Nikkei Asian Review, the subsidiary made the products look as though they met customer requirements. The company admitted that 13 domestic and overseas companies, including at least one South Korean company, are affected.
In a statement issued roughly around the time president Akihiro Nikkaku was bowing to news reporters as Japanese management tends to do when caught engaging in criminal activity, Toray maintained that the “amount by which the data was adjusted to fit customer contract standards was insignificant.” The company believed there were no safety issues involved. Toray Hybrid Cord discovered the problem during a July 2016 internal compliance check, with Toray president Akihiro Nikkaku being informed of the matter the following October.

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Nov 28, 2017.

Market Talk – November 24th, 2017

Having had an extremely quiet day Thursday with Thanksgiving holidays in the states, many kept an eager eye on China following yesterdays 3% share decline. We did see the repeated weakness for most if the day, but managed an impressive rally just ahead of the close to finish small higher (+0.1%). The talk surrounding tighter lending rules already hit bond prices lower but failed to affect the equity in todays trading. Given that it is Western governments that are over leveraging, the guess is any weakness here in Asia will probably be short-lived. In Japan the Nikkei spent most of the morning in the red but rallied in the final hour to also close a touch firmer (+0.1%). Although this sounds impressive price action, when considering the Yen’s move it should have been considerably more. The Yen was playing low 111’s which implies people are back in-search of a safe-haven. Admittedly, the DXY did not trade too well Friday which actually lines up very well for this weekends ECM Point. The SENSEX managed a small positive (
+0.3% Friday but even that is looking toppy and declines seem to be forecast of Tuesday 28th.

This post was published at Armstrong Economics on Nov 24, 2017.

“Very Close To Irrational Exuberance”: Asian Equities Break Above All-Time High As Hang Seng Clears 30,000

Following the new all-time high in US equities, the MSCI Asia Pacific Index broke through its November 2007 peak to make an all-time high in Wednesday’s trading session. This was something we noted could happen yesterday in ‘SocGen: Asian Equities Are So Awesome, A China Minsky Moment Is ‘Manageable’. The dollar weakened slightly after outgoing Fed Chairman, Janet Yellen, cautioned against interest rates rising too quickly in one of her last Q&As at NYU on Tuesday evening. The MSCI Emerging Market Index hit its highest level in six years and the Shanghai Composite rose 0.5% despite the lack of a net liquidity injection from the PBoC.
As Bloomberg notes, Asian stocks headed for a record close for the second time this month as the regional benchmark gauge surpassed its 2007 peak, led by energy and industrial stocks after U. S. equities continued their bounce from a two-week slide.
The MSCI Asia Pacific Index rose 0.7 percent to 172.70 as of 1:01 p.m. in Hong Kong. The gauge passed its 2007 closing high on an intraday basis on Nov. 9 but didn’t hold the level. Japan’s Topix index climbed for a second day Wednesday, rising 0.4 percent, after its worst week in seven months. Hong Kong’s benchmark Hang Seng Index breached the 30,000 level for the first time in a decade, boosted by China banks and energy stocks.
‘Anyone who missed the rally probably wonders if it is too late to join the party,’ Andrew Swan, head of Asian and global emerging markets equities at BlackRock Inc., said in a statement Wednesday. ‘We don’t believe it is.’

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Nov 22, 2017.

Asian Stocks Smash Records; Dollar Slides As Crude Surges To July 2015 Highs

Global shares hit another record high on Wednesday, propelled higher by what increasingly more call (ir)rational exuberance, and investors’ unflagging enthusiasm for tech stocks. That said, S&P futures are unchanged the morning before Thanksgiving (at least before the market open ramp), as are European stocks (Stoxx 600 is flat), despite the euphoria in the Asian session which saw the MSCI Asia Pac index hit a new all time high…

… as oil jumped, rising as much as $1.15 to $57.98/bbl, the highest since July 2015, following yesterday’s API report which showed crude stocks fell another 6.4mmbbls and a Keystone pipeline outage shaprly tightened the market, while the dollar fell after Janet Yellen warned against raising rates too fast and the euro gained amid new moves to end Germany’s political impasse.

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Nov 22, 2017.

FX Weekly Preview: EUR Darts Back To Uptrend, But Can It Last

Submitted by Shant Movsesian and Rajan Dhall MSTA of fxdailyterminal.com
The key move in the FX majors last week as the upturn in EUR/USD, where the first key area of support on the downside at 1.1500-1.1625 held well to generate the move up into the mid-upper 1.1800’s. In the previous week we also asked whether the USD correction was over, and some may assume that based on the key weighting in the USD index – it is. Clearly the longer term outlook on Europe has been the driver of what is now seen as a default position in FX. The German economy has been leading the way with solid growth, as Q3 saw a rise of 0.8%, which should be confirmed on Thursday. Alongside this, we get the PMI data for Nov which will likely confirm more of the same across the whole Euro region, with the German IFO on Friday unlikely to buck the positive trend as the institute maintain their positive growth projections.
Over the weekend however, the coalition talks in Germany have made the headlines with the FDP leader walking out of the negotiations with Chancellor Merkel’s CDU and the Greens, with wide ‘differences’ of opinion on immigration and climate amongst other issues lower down the pecking order. This leaves Merkel with 3 options; a new election, governing without a majority or continuing talks for an eventual agreement – all 3 to keep the EUR from maintaining the upside bias with clear conviction. That said, we are in a market which is getting used to brushing aside key risk factors, and the early Asian response is usually tempered to some degree by the more liquid London markets – as we saw with GBP the previous weekend!

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Nov 20, 2017.

Market Talk- November 17, 2017

The tax reform bill passing the US House yesterday certainly added to sentiment, after great earnings releases for markets but Asia need more help for cash today. Having opened strong all core markets then drifted and even saw the Nikkei trade negative. For the week it closes down 1.3% which has broken a two month rally. The Hang Seng performed well all day closing up around +0.6% but only off-set the decline in the Shanghai (-0.5%). India traded well following Thursday’s credit upgrade eventually adding an additional +0.7% onto yesterdays gain. All eyes are still on the DXY as we approach the weekend as just below we have the 50 Day Moving Average at 93.50. Oil has bounced following comments from potential output cuts led by OPEC.

This post was published at Armstrong Economics on Nov 17, 2017.

Mueller Subpoena Spooks Dollar, Sends European Stocks, US Futures Lower

Yesterday’s torrid, broad-based rally looked set to continue overnight until early in the Japanese session, when the USD tumbled and dragged down with it the USDJPY, Nikkei, and US futures following a WSJ report that Robert Mueller had issued a subpoena to more than a dozen top Trump administration officials in mid October.
And as traders sit at their desks on Friday, U. S. index futures point to a lower open as European stocks fall, struggling to follow Asian equities higher as the euro strengthened at the end of a tumultuous week. Chinese stocks dropped while Indian shares and the rupee gain on Moody’s upgrade. The MSCI world equity index was up 0.1% on the day, but was heading for a 0.1% fall on the week. The dollar declined against most major peers, while Treasury yields dropped and oil rose.
Europe’s Stoxx 600 Index fluctuated before turning lower as much as 0.3% in brisk volumes, dropping towards the 200-DMA, although about 1% above Wednesday’s intraday low; weakness was observed in retail, mining, utilities sectors. In the past two weeks, the basic resources sector index is down 6%, oil & gas down 5.8%, autos down 4.9%, retail down 3.4%; while real estate is the only sector in green, up 0.1%. The Stoxx 600 is on track to record a weekly loss of 1.3%, adding to last week’s sell-off amid sharp rebound in euro, global equity pullback. The Euro climbed for the first time in three days after ECB President Mario Draghi said he was optimistic for wage growth in the region, although stressed the need for patience, speaking in Frankfurt. European bonds were mixed. The pound pared some of its earlier gains after comments from Brexit Secretary David Davis signaling a continued stand-off in negotiations with the European Union.
In Asia, the Nikkei 225 took its time to catch up to the WSJ report that US Special Counsel Mueller has issued a Subpoena for Russia-related documents from Trump campaign officials, although reports pointing to North Korea conducting ‘aggressive’ work on the construction of a ballistic missile submarine helped the selloff. The Japanese blue-chip index rose as much as 1.8% in early dealing, but the broad-based dollar retreat led to the index unwinding the bulk of its gains; the index finished the session up 0.2% as the yen jumped to the strongest in four-weeks. Australia’s ASX 200 added 0.2% with IT, healthcare and telecoms leading the way, as utilities lagged. Mainland Chinese stocks fell, with the Shanghai Comp down circa 0.5% as the PBoC’s reversel in liquidity injections (overnight net drain of 10bn yuan) did little to boost risk appetite, as Kweichou Moutai (viewed as a bellwether among Chinese blue chips) fell sharply. This left the index facing its biggest weekly loss in 3 months, while the Hang Seng rallied with IT leading the way higher. Indian stocks and the currency advanced after Moody’s Investors Service raised the nation’s credit rating.

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Nov 17, 2017.

Goldman Reveals Its Top Trade Recommendations For 2018

It’s that time of the year again when with just a few weeks left in the year, Goldman unveils its top trade recommendations for the year ahead. And while Goldman’s Top trades for 2016 was an abysmal disaster, with the bank getting stopped out with a loss on virtually all trade recos within weeks after the infamous China crash in early 2016, its 2017 “top trade” recos did far better. Which brings us to Thursday morning, when Goldman just unveiled the first seven of its recommended Top Trades for 2018 which “represent some of the highest conviction market expressions of our economic outlook.”
Without further ado, here are the initial 7 trades (on which Goldman :
Top Trade #1: Position for more Fed hikes and a rebuild of term premium by shorting 10-year US Treasuries. Top Trade #2: Go long EUR/JPY for continued rotation around a flat Dollar. Top Trade #3: Go long the EM growth cycle via the MSCI EM stock market index. Top Trade #4: Go long inflation risk premium in the Euro area via EUR 5-year 5-year forward inflation. Top Trade #5: Position for ‘early vs. late’ cycle in EM vs the US by going long the EMBI Global Index against short the US High Yield iBoxx Index. Top Trade #6: Own diversifed Asian growth, and the hedge interest rate risk via FX relative value (Long INR, IDR, KRW vs. short SGD and JPY). Top Trade #7: Go long the global growth and non-oil commodity beta through long BRL, CLP, PEN vs. short USD.

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Nov 16, 2017.

Duties Imposed Against Chinese “Dumping” Hurt American Consumers

For years, special interests have called on the U. S. government to ‘level the playing field’ in the form of duties, levies, and other antiquated measures. Democrats and Republicans alike have aired their grievances over the trade deficit, grumbling about exporters hurting American workers by flooding the market with cheap goods. These complaints are deeply misguided.
Over the last decade, China has been accused of tilting international trade in its favor. Is this true? No, it is demonstrably false, as Beijing’s subsidized exports greatly benefit American consumers far more than the Chinese population.
You can’t tell that to the U. S. government, though.
In late October, the Department of Commerce announced that China dumped aluminum foil on the U. S. market, selling the goods at ‘unfairly low prices.’
Trade policy under Trump hasn’t been dramatically different from his predecessors, though. Who who monitor trade deals have forgotten about President Barack Obama’s 35% tax on Chinese tires and President George W. Bush’s 20% tax on imported steel.
US Imposes Anti-Dumping Duties Before Trump’s stop in Beijing as part of his 12-day Asian tour, the U. S. government imposed duties ranging between 96.81% and 162.24% on Chinese aluminum foil. The preliminary report determined that China dumped nearly $400 million worth of aluminum foil imports on the U. S. market in 2016 at very low prices.

This post was published at Ludwig von Mises Institute on November 16, 2017.