Double Whammy China PMI Misses Spark Sell-Side Demands For More Stimulus

A record-breaking surge in monthly credit creation and a trillion Yuan of QE-lite was enough to provide a glimmer of hope into the tumbling Chinese economy for one or maybe two months but with the real estate market continuing to free-fall, it should be no surprise that China’s PMIs finally catch down to the erstwhile reality simmering under the surface in the ultimate centrally-planned economy. China’s official government PMI dropped from 30-month highs, missed expectations and the early month flash print, to less exuberant 51.1 reading (with Steel industry new orders totally collapsing) with both medium- and small-companies printing contractionary sub-50 levels. Then (after Japan’s PMI beat – of course it did as hard data crashes worst on record), HSBC China PMI also missed, printing a slightly expansionary 50.2 Showing, as BofA warns “the two PMIs both show that the current recovery is relatively weak and choppy…” and RBS adds “we expect the government to interpret such an outlook as challenging its growth target and to take more, and more significant, measures to support growth.”

As Goldman writes,
August official PMI tends to be biased on the upside. Since the data started in 2005, this is the second time it fell in August (first time was August 2012). The degree of seasonality probably has been reduced in recent years but may still exist. This suggests underlying slowdown might be more meaningful, which is consistent with the weak reading of the HSBC PMI.

This post was published at Zero Hedge on 08/31/2014 –.